How to:

Several years ago, I was introduced to a magical concept. What would it look like if our world didn’t constantly require us to prove who we are?

The more you think about it, the more you realize how hostile this paradigm is. In the pursuit of ideals of safety and order, we’ve put up endless barriers—roadblocks to natural movement and normal daily interaction. Every day, everything from your front door to your car to your workplace to your computer requires you to prove your identity. You’re asked for it again when you grab coffee and need to pay, and when you enter public transit. And then your phone, computer, smart watch, etc. asks for a secret password too. It’s endless, dehumanizing, and all combined, probably the highest friction interaction in our daily lives.

I first worked on these kinds of challenges at Google as part of the Smart Lock team and then touched on them again during my time founding Fiber, where we sought to make it easier to understand the workplace social graph by understanding how people interacted with space and others around them.

ph-encrypted-token-4.jpg

Since then, the world has changed dramatically, and in particular given the challenge COVID adds on top, there’s a renewed interest in how we can use these emerging technologies to transform how we interact with and within our built environment. How could we transform this dynamic to make our world more efficient, sustainable, resilient, customized, convenient, and safe? What if our environments could adapt automatically to our presence? What if our buildings, rooms, and spaces could recognize us and welcome us?

I’m excited to share that I’m joining Proxy to explore how design can transform these ideas of identity, proximity, and space. Part of what has interested me most about this opportunity is that these concepts have never been more important to critically investigate than now, during a worldwide pandemic where the world is rethinking how interactions with and within our shared spaces could work.

How can these technologies help us return to shared spaces safely?

Door_3_Wide_0579.jpg

I’m joining a small, driven, and rapidly growing design team to lead design for new products and expand what Proxy can be, from a product design standpoint and as a company and brand. Proxy recently raised $42M in series-B venture capital funding, and it’s growing fast. It’s just getting started in this mission, and while its beachhead focus has been access control and security, it’s building a foundation that extends well beyond that.

Proxy is building a sort of spatial operating system—a set of underlying technologies and interfaces—for the physical world, all powered by this idea of a unique “identity signal”. This signal includes a spectrum of information like access permissions and personal preferences so that the world can dynamically adapt to you, all while preserving the user’s privacy.

“Proxy is creating a unique identity signal for every person on the planet that incorporates their privileges, preferences, and context to augment how they interact with the world around them.”

It all starts with a signal emitted from your phone. Nearby readers, which Proxy also designs and builds, detect that signal and your environment adapts. Today, doors unlock as if by magic. Tomorrow, much more will happen automatically, too.

The horizons for this are endless, including easier payments for faster checkout lines, cozier homes where everything is ready right when you need it, more welcoming workplaces, more sustainable energy usage, and more virus-resilient communities, just to name very few. It’s a world that automatically supports you, wherever you go.

“The most profound technologies are those that disappear. They weave themselves into the fabric of everyday life until they are indistinguishable from it.”

— MARK WEISER, COMPUTER SCIENTIST + CTO AT XEROX PARC

I’m joining an interdisciplinary design team committed to building a full-stack, cross-functional design process, and an incredible team of product managers and engineers. One that combines industrial, brand, growth, and digital product design (to name a few) together as essential components of the overall user experience.

In the internet of things, feedback loops are the foundation of user experiences. The Proxy product can be thought of similarly, and the interplay between the physical and virtual worlds are essential components in conveying feedback, affordance, and intuitive control. I’m looking forward to working to make those magical low- or no-interface interactions delightful, bridging physical and screen-based products, humans and their environments.

I can’t wait to get started and share more soon. Stay tuned.

Door_7_Wide_1048.jpg
Work

I'm joining Proxy

Several years ago, I was introduced to a magical concept. What would it look like if our world didn’t constantly require us to prove who we are?

The more you think about it, the more you realize how hostile this paradigm is. In the pursuit of ideals of safety and order, we’ve put up endless barriers—roadblocks to natural movement and normal daily interaction. Every day, everything from your front door to your car to your workplace to your computer requires you to prove your identity. You’re asked for it again when you grab coffee and need to pay, and when you enter public transit. And then your phone, computer, smart watch, etc. asks for a secret password too. It’s endless, dehumanizing, and all combined, probably the highest friction interaction in our daily lives.

I first worked on these kinds of challenges at Google as part of the Smart Lock team and then touched on them again during my time founding Fiber, where we sought to make it easier to understand the workplace social graph by understanding how people interacted with space and others around them.

ph-encrypted-token-4.jpg

Since then, the world has changed dramatically, and in particular given the challenge COVID adds on top, there’s a renewed interest in how we can use these emerging technologies to transform how we interact with and within our built environment. How could we transform this dynamic to make our world more efficient, sustainable, resilient, customized, convenient, and safe? What if our environments could adapt automatically to our presence? What if our buildings, rooms, and spaces could recognize us and welcome us?

I’m excited to share that I’m joining Proxy to explore how design can transform these ideas of identity, proximity, and space. Part of what has interested me most about this opportunity is that these concepts have never been more important to critically investigate than now, during a worldwide pandemic where the world is rethinking how interactions with and within our shared spaces could work.

How can these technologies help us return to shared spaces safely?

Door_3_Wide_0579.jpg

I’m joining a small, driven, and rapidly growing design team to lead design for new products and expand what Proxy can be, from a product design standpoint and as a company and brand. Proxy recently raised $42M in series-B venture capital funding, and it’s growing fast. It’s just getting started in this mission, and while its beachhead focus has been access control and security, it’s building a foundation that extends well beyond that.

Proxy is building a sort of spatial operating system—a set of underlying technologies and interfaces—for the physical world, all powered by this idea of a unique “identity signal”. This signal includes a spectrum of information like access permissions and personal preferences so that the world can dynamically adapt to you, all while preserving the user’s privacy.

“Proxy is creating a unique identity signal for every person on the planet that incorporates their privileges, preferences, and context to augment how they interact with the world around them.”

It all starts with a signal emitted from your phone. Nearby readers, which Proxy also designs and builds, detect that signal and your environment adapts. Today, doors unlock as if by magic. Tomorrow, much more will happen automatically, too.

The horizons for this are endless, including easier payments for faster checkout lines, cozier homes where everything is ready right when you need it, more welcoming workplaces, more sustainable energy usage, and more virus-resilient communities, just to name very few. It’s a world that automatically supports you, wherever you go.

“The most profound technologies are those that disappear. They weave themselves into the fabric of everyday life until they are indistinguishable from it.”

— MARK WEISER, COMPUTER SCIENTIST + CTO AT XEROX PARC

I’m joining an interdisciplinary design team committed to building a full-stack, cross-functional design process, and an incredible team of product managers and engineers. One that combines industrial, brand, growth, and digital product design (to name a few) together as essential components of the overall user experience.

In the internet of things, feedback loops are the foundation of user experiences. The Proxy product can be thought of similarly, and the interplay between the physical and virtual worlds are essential components in conveying feedback, affordance, and intuitive control. I’m looking forward to working to make those magical low- or no-interface interactions delightful, bridging physical and screen-based products, humans and their environments.

I can’t wait to get started and share more soon. Stay tuned.

Door_7_Wide_1048.jpg
Updated continuously • Last edited on
9.9.23
No items found.
Work

I'm joining Proxy

No items found.
Updated continuously •
Last edited on
9.9.23

Several years ago, I was introduced to a magical concept. What would it look like if our world didn’t constantly require us to prove who we are?

The more you think about it, the more you realize how hostile this paradigm is. In the pursuit of ideals of safety and order, we’ve put up endless barriers—roadblocks to natural movement and normal daily interaction. Every day, everything from your front door to your car to your workplace to your computer requires you to prove your identity. You’re asked for it again when you grab coffee and need to pay, and when you enter public transit. And then your phone, computer, smart watch, etc. asks for a secret password too. It’s endless, dehumanizing, and all combined, probably the highest friction interaction in our daily lives.

I first worked on these kinds of challenges at Google as part of the Smart Lock team and then touched on them again during my time founding Fiber, where we sought to make it easier to understand the workplace social graph by understanding how people interacted with space and others around them.

ph-encrypted-token-4.jpg

Since then, the world has changed dramatically, and in particular given the challenge COVID adds on top, there’s a renewed interest in how we can use these emerging technologies to transform how we interact with and within our built environment. How could we transform this dynamic to make our world more efficient, sustainable, resilient, customized, convenient, and safe? What if our environments could adapt automatically to our presence? What if our buildings, rooms, and spaces could recognize us and welcome us?

I’m excited to share that I’m joining Proxy to explore how design can transform these ideas of identity, proximity, and space. Part of what has interested me most about this opportunity is that these concepts have never been more important to critically investigate than now, during a worldwide pandemic where the world is rethinking how interactions with and within our shared spaces could work.

How can these technologies help us return to shared spaces safely?

Door_3_Wide_0579.jpg

I’m joining a small, driven, and rapidly growing design team to lead design for new products and expand what Proxy can be, from a product design standpoint and as a company and brand. Proxy recently raised $42M in series-B venture capital funding, and it’s growing fast. It’s just getting started in this mission, and while its beachhead focus has been access control and security, it’s building a foundation that extends well beyond that.

Proxy is building a sort of spatial operating system—a set of underlying technologies and interfaces—for the physical world, all powered by this idea of a unique “identity signal”. This signal includes a spectrum of information like access permissions and personal preferences so that the world can dynamically adapt to you, all while preserving the user’s privacy.

“Proxy is creating a unique identity signal for every person on the planet that incorporates their privileges, preferences, and context to augment how they interact with the world around them.”

It all starts with a signal emitted from your phone. Nearby readers, which Proxy also designs and builds, detect that signal and your environment adapts. Today, doors unlock as if by magic. Tomorrow, much more will happen automatically, too.

The horizons for this are endless, including easier payments for faster checkout lines, cozier homes where everything is ready right when you need it, more welcoming workplaces, more sustainable energy usage, and more virus-resilient communities, just to name very few. It’s a world that automatically supports you, wherever you go.

“The most profound technologies are those that disappear. They weave themselves into the fabric of everyday life until they are indistinguishable from it.”

— MARK WEISER, COMPUTER SCIENTIST + CTO AT XEROX PARC

I’m joining an interdisciplinary design team committed to building a full-stack, cross-functional design process, and an incredible team of product managers and engineers. One that combines industrial, brand, growth, and digital product design (to name a few) together as essential components of the overall user experience.

In the internet of things, feedback loops are the foundation of user experiences. The Proxy product can be thought of similarly, and the interplay between the physical and virtual worlds are essential components in conveying feedback, affordance, and intuitive control. I’m looking forward to working to make those magical low- or no-interface interactions delightful, bridging physical and screen-based products, humans and their environments.

I can’t wait to get started and share more soon. Stay tuned.

Door_7_Wide_1048.jpg

Read more

No items found.