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Neo-retro-leisurecore is having a (decadent) moment

The glitz, glamour, and consumerist materialism stereotypically associated with the 80s is back in a big way. A few interesting brands are drawing inspiration from the era to create richly designed brand fantasy worlds.

What's driving this trend? Why is it so popular? What does it mean for the future of community and consumer branding?

The Poolsuite era

Arguably this was all started by Marty at Poolsuite.

A still frame of the Poolsuite Executive Member NFT, which entitles you to attend various Poolsuite events

Poolsuite hosted a cobranded event with Ralph Lauren in Miami to kick off their NFT partnership
This is a real sunscreen that was invented just a few years ago

Vacation's commitment to airtight brand storytelling is truly incredible: when I ordered Vacation, it came in an old-timey pharmacy paper bag with a dot-matrix-printed receipt! I'm not sure how they're physically creating these nowadays. You literally can't plug one in to any modern computer.

Racquet Rose and The Rochambeau Club

Then there's the Rochambeau Club, a fictional tennis and health club set in the real town of Saint Paul-de-Vence in Cotes-de-Provence. Here, too, there's an almost crazy commitment to playing the part: the website features fictional staff members with fictional jobs, a drawn map of the fictional club grounds, fictional hospitality industry membership affiliation logos, and of course, a live-updated notification of what appears to be the real temperature in the real town.

There's even a map of the (fictional) club grounds, complete with such features as a "Panoramic Sorbet Lounge". Simply perfect.
At their London pop-up shop, you could buy (and I did) a keyring with the promise it'll correspond to a locker in a future physical club

All of this extensive brand storytelling is actually in service to a single primary end: Racquet Rosé, a (real) rosé wine they sell (for about 120 pounds for a case of 6), alongside other Rochambeau Club merchandise at the club shop.

Field Notes

Neo-retro-leisurecore is having a (decadent) moment

The glitz, glamour, and consumerist materialism stereotypically associated with the 80s is back in a big way. A few interesting brands are drawing inspiration from the era to create richly designed brand fantasy worlds.

What's driving this trend? Why is it so popular? What does it mean for the future of community and consumer branding?

The Poolsuite era

Arguably this was all started by Marty at Poolsuite.

A still frame of the Poolsuite Executive Member NFT, which entitles you to attend various Poolsuite events

Poolsuite hosted a cobranded event with Ralph Lauren in Miami to kick off their NFT partnership
This is a real sunscreen that was invented just a few years ago

Vacation's commitment to airtight brand storytelling is truly incredible: when I ordered Vacation, it came in an old-timey pharmacy paper bag with a dot-matrix-printed receipt! I'm not sure how they're physically creating these nowadays. You literally can't plug one in to any modern computer.

Racquet Rose and The Rochambeau Club

Then there's the Rochambeau Club, a fictional tennis and health club set in the real town of Saint Paul-de-Vence in Cotes-de-Provence. Here, too, there's an almost crazy commitment to playing the part: the website features fictional staff members with fictional jobs, a drawn map of the fictional club grounds, fictional hospitality industry membership affiliation logos, and of course, a live-updated notification of what appears to be the real temperature in the real town.

There's even a map of the (fictional) club grounds, complete with such features as a "Panoramic Sorbet Lounge". Simply perfect.
At their London pop-up shop, you could buy (and I did) a keyring with the promise it'll correspond to a locker in a future physical club

All of this extensive brand storytelling is actually in service to a single primary end: Racquet Rosé, a (real) rosé wine they sell (for about 120 pounds for a case of 6), alongside other Rochambeau Club merchandise at the club shop.

Updated continuously • Last edited on
1.10.24
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Field Notes

Neo-retro-leisurecore is having a (decadent) moment

No items found.
Updated continuously •
Last edited on
1.10.24

The glitz, glamour, and consumerist materialism stereotypically associated with the 80s is back in a big way. A few interesting brands are drawing inspiration from the era to create richly designed brand fantasy worlds.

What's driving this trend? Why is it so popular? What does it mean for the future of community and consumer branding?

The Poolsuite era

Arguably this was all started by Marty at Poolsuite.

A still frame of the Poolsuite Executive Member NFT, which entitles you to attend various Poolsuite events

Poolsuite hosted a cobranded event with Ralph Lauren in Miami to kick off their NFT partnership
This is a real sunscreen that was invented just a few years ago

Vacation's commitment to airtight brand storytelling is truly incredible: when I ordered Vacation, it came in an old-timey pharmacy paper bag with a dot-matrix-printed receipt! I'm not sure how they're physically creating these nowadays. You literally can't plug one in to any modern computer.

Racquet Rose and The Rochambeau Club

Then there's the Rochambeau Club, a fictional tennis and health club set in the real town of Saint Paul-de-Vence in Cotes-de-Provence. Here, too, there's an almost crazy commitment to playing the part: the website features fictional staff members with fictional jobs, a drawn map of the fictional club grounds, fictional hospitality industry membership affiliation logos, and of course, a live-updated notification of what appears to be the real temperature in the real town.

There's even a map of the (fictional) club grounds, complete with such features as a "Panoramic Sorbet Lounge". Simply perfect.
At their London pop-up shop, you could buy (and I did) a keyring with the promise it'll correspond to a locker in a future physical club

All of this extensive brand storytelling is actually in service to a single primary end: Racquet Rosé, a (real) rosé wine they sell (for about 120 pounds for a case of 6), alongside other Rochambeau Club merchandise at the club shop.

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